HealthWorld

Monkey pox: New York City asks to rename the disease deemed stigmatizing

New York City asked the WHO on Tuesday to rename monkeypox, a name deemed stigmatizing and which risks pushing patients to isolate themselves rather than seek care.

The whole nature of this request is peculiar, to put it mildly. It is possible that the disease known as “monkeypox,” which is referred to in English as “monkeypox,” should be renamed. In any event, here is the request that the city of New York sent to the World Health Organization on the 26th of this month, which can be found here. According to the city, the name of the condition could cause individuals to want to isolate themselves rather than seek medical attention.

“We are increasingly concerned about the potentially devastating and stigmatizing effects that messaging around monkeypox can have on already vulnerable communities,” New York City Health Commissioner Ashwin Vasan wrote in a statement and in a letter to WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. “We are increasingly concerned about the potentially devastating and stigmatizing effects that messaging around monkeypox can have on already vulnerable communities.”

The Health Commissioner asserts that this “terminology” is “rooted in a racist and sad history for communities of color,” and that there is a problem with the terminology. In his letter, he recalls the negative effects of false information during the appearance of the AIDS virus (HIV), as well as the racism suffered by Asian communities after the Covid-19 pandemic, which US President Donald Trump had described as a “Chinese virus.” He also recalls the negative effects of false information during the appearance of the Ebola virus.

“The continued use of the term monkeypox to characterize the current outbreak may rekindle these traumatic memories of racism and stigma. This is especially true for black people and other people of color, as well as community members. “LGBTQIA+ people may feel ashamed to access potentially life-saving medical care because of their identity,” explains Ashwin Vasan.

To refresh your memory, monkeypox can be contracted by anyone; however, since it was first discovered in Europe and the United States, the virus has spread almost exclusively among men who have had intercourse with other men. With 1,092 instances of contamination found in the city since the beginning of the pandemic, New York is the metropolis on this side of the ocean that has been hit the hardest by the virus.

Mission Diagnostics will soon begin its tests.

Mission Diagnostics has announced that it will become the third significant commercial lab in the United States to test for monkeypox infection. This announcement was made today. According to the organization’s announcement, medical care providers all throughout the country should begin preparing for the test in the first part of the month of August.

With testing services being provided by Quest, Labcorp, and the Mayo Clinic, in addition to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the United States should be able to carry out 60,000 tests on a weekly basis before the end of this month. Quest will be responsible for carrying out a significant portion of those examinations.

There is a possibility that a new clade will fill the episode.

A phylogenomic investigation of readily available monkeypox infection genomes from the ongoing outbreak reveals that a new clade appears to have emerged in Europe around the beginning of March. This finding was made possible by the fact that the genomes were accessible. According to the authors of the study, this clade, in conjunction with a declining historical insusceptibility to smallpox due to vaccines, may contribute to the spread of the epidemic.

In a different epidemiological analysis of the outbreak in Spain, 85.8 percent of the case patients who had accessible data reported they believed their likely route of infection was through personal and delayed contact during sex. In addition, the majority of patients experienced an anogenital rash as well as swollen lymph nodes; Madrid is home to 61.1% of the total patient population.

There were a total of 1,242 beginning cases found in males and only 14 in females. According to the people who developed the study, the median age of the case patients was 37 years old, and all of the case patients, with the exception of one, were adults.

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